Slow TV is so boring it’s addictive.

I recently watched a TED.com video: Thomas Hellum: The world’s most boring television … and why it’s hilariously addictiveyou can watch the embedded video below.

They tried to make a radio program marking the date of an invasion at the exact time it took place, alas their scheduling wouldn’t suite that show. This idea grew on to what else could they do a show about that would take a very long time?  They went to make a show about a 7 hour train ride. Seriously a SEVEN HOUR (and forty minute) TRAIN RIDE! This led to 1.2 million Norwegians viewing one segment of the train program, and blew up social media avenues like Twitter and Facebook back in 2009.

Now I won’t spoil the rest of the video for you because it actually is hilarious and you should watch it. Theses crazy Norwegian’s were doing the opposite modern entertainment by avoiding overplayed story lines, dramatic twists, and chopped up timelines. I kept saying to myself how is this so addictive?!?

What if other rural Kansas events could be just as entertaining and educational for viewers (or followers on social media) under a similar format? Just a few examples would be a live uninterrupted feed from the Bike Across Kansas, maybe the Cuba Rock-A-Thon, or even crops being harvested in a field and hauled to town. Would you watch those? Would it change the stereotyped idea of Kansas for city folk?

If you are a fan of rural ideas check out this video and others on TED.com – http://blog.ted.com/2014/08/13/how-tedx-is-spreading-through-rural-colombia/

You’ve heard about slow food. Now here’s slow … TV? In this very funny talk, Norwegian television producer Thomas Hellum shares how he and his team began to broadcast long, boring events, often live — and found a rapt audience. Shows include a 7-hour train journey, an 18-hour fishing expedition and a 5.5-day ferry voyage along the coast of Norway. The results are both beautiful and fascinating. Really.